EPA Pick Could Lead to Job Boom

Senator Shelley Moore Capito (R-WV) talked about energy policy, its significant impact on the states, including West Virginia, as well as Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt’s confirmation hearing for EPA administrator with Breitbart News Daily SiriusXM host Alex Marlow on Wednesday.

“I think he’s a great pick,” said Capito of Pruitt, adding, “He’s from an energy-producing state. He has a history of working out environmental issues across state lines.”

Read More


source: http://www.breitbart.com/radio/2017/01/18/capito-pruitt-bring-common-sense-balance-epa-protecting-jobs-economy-environment/

You may also like...

  • Robert Pekarik

    We the people dodged a bullet by electing Donald Trump instead of continuing the destruction of America by the immoral and perverted liberal progressive democrats and their mentally disturbed followers. Just imagine for one moment the liberal radicals who have no issue destroying private property, threatening true American citizens for voicing common sense opinions. The women’s march over the past weekend led by abortionists and Hollywood perverts praising the culture of death. Cowards everyone.

    • Rx7pj

      What the hell are you smoking?

      • Robert Pekarik

        We the people who are the foundation of the United States of America know what drugs, perversion, immorality and killing babies has done to America. We watch every day as you liberal progressives destroy our morality, patriotism and our One Nation Under God. You people have sold your souls to evil and have attempted to fundamentally transform truth and honesty into lies and corruption. The real question is how much damage will you continue to do to our nation. Corrupt and perverted to the core every one of you.

        • The Redman

          U the white-folks, have ruined america

          • Robert Pekarik

            And people like you are not Americans, so what’s the beef – not enough property to destroy? Not enough babies to murder in the womb? Not enough lies to tell? Not enough children to pervert?

          • The Redman

            U speak well of white-folks. bobbie-sue. hahahhahaahahahahh

          • walter white

            Give The Redman a break. He is only 16, and trying to get promoted to the 6th grade.

    • The Redman

      U the white-folks, huh.

      • Robert Pekarik

        No, we the smart, patriotic and honest folk.

        • The Redman

          While on the EPA rap. white-folks use more water den any other race in the world, and still stink. haaaahhahahahaha. how smart is dat, stinky

          • Robert Pekarik

            And the only reason you use water is to take your drugs.

          • The Redman

            There R way more of U stupid pinkies overdosing on pills and meth den U have lice. and white-folks like U, tend 2 have lots of lice. hahahhahahahahahahh. bobbie-jo-bo. hahahahhahahahaha

  • Raul

    Energy independent in 4 yrs can come true now.

    • Rx7pj

      Whats your plan for when the fossile fuel run out?? Or the air becomes unbreathable and the water undrinkable?

      • Christopher Tabin

        oh why don’t you just crawl under the same tree that you came from before we knock it down?

        • The Redman

          Christine taboo

      • cccarr

        what are you smoking? ever hear of technology and inventiveness. they already are changing energy production and process. we will do very well without a. bunch of bureaucrat slapping their edicts on u.s. businesses.

        • Mark Wright

          Hmmm… Technology and inventiveness. But to achieve that you need highly skilled people. That’s something which is lacking in the US, where there are over 5.9 million unfilled jobs. The jobs are unfilled because of a dearth of people with the right skills. Net result is companies are outsourcing or bringing in migrant labour on H1B visas. Trump has said he’d bring manufacturing jobs back to the US, but has been silent on educating and reskilling the population to fill these vacancies. I wonder why.

          • Tomahawk

            Ask him.

          • Mark Wright

            I would, but I feel that the answer would be filled with ‘alternative facts’, assuming he deigned to respond in the first place. Actually, you can see which way the wind is blowing by looking at Trump’s policies on education generally. He hasn’t shown any appetite for providing young people with the same basic skill set, since his avowed intent is to do away with Common Core which provides this. So the children of the lower paid will get relegated to undertake those menial jobs that have not been automated, or be unemployed. The pool of skilled workers will shrink yet further and stifle US industry.
            Fortress America (aka Putting America First) will impose tariffs on goods from abroad, but tariff setting is a two way street. US exporters will find that the market for their goods dwindles as other nations impose swingeing tariffs in return. The US auto industry will find that overseas sales will dry up as customers find cheaper, better equipped vehicles from South East Asia or turn to Europe for luxury models. That then present problems for US companies, who then lose the benefit of economies of scale. So prices within the US may also rise to compensate.

          • Tomahawk

            And I feel that you are displaying a culmination of ‘alternative facts’ that are no more than demonstrably twisted half truths and bald faced lies. Common Core is doing the exact opposite of what you state. Our kids are being indoctrinated. The administration that Pres. Trump is putting together is going to change our course as a nation. And it’s about time. On tariffs, though, I tend to agree.

          • Mark Wright

            I also agree that Trump is going to change the course of the US. I’m not sure that the new direction is going to be to the liking of the majority of Americans. Common Core provides all kids a foundation in literacy and numeracy – essential building blocks for pretty much the rest of the curriculum. Removing this will mean that education becomes a zipcode lottery. Now, if you happen to have the income and live in an area that provides a good standard of education, then maybe that doesn’t worry you, but the blunt fact remains that this is yet another way of widening the gap between the rich and the poor. The US, under Trump, will look more like India, except in India there is a huge emphasis on building a skilled workforce.

          • Tomahawk

            And again, I completely disagree. Think teacher’s unions and failed parents.

          • Mark Wright

            Sorry, not sure I follow your argument. Yes, it’s true that there is an expectation by many parents that they don’t need to be involved in their kids education as they see that as the province of teachers. In part this may be because the parents themselves are poorly educated. Unless you try and address this by giving kids a basic level of literacy and numeracy, the problem will persist. The lack of common standards will mean divisions in teaching delivery and pupil attainment levels.

          • Tomahawk

            Think “discipline”.

          • Mark Wright

            Discipline is a parental responsibility. Teachers cannot force kids to learn. The most they can do with disruptive pupils is to exclude them from class, which is counterproductive to learning. If you bring back corporal punishment, you invite abuse and litigation.

          • Tomahawk

            My God you’re dense. Allow me to spell it for you. Failed parents: Those who either don’t, or can’t, instill discipline in the mindset of their children.
            Kids with little or no self discipline are nearly always destined to fail. And that flaw normally begins to make itself known long before the age of 18. I never said one word about corporal punishment, as that is a parental responsibility as well.
            Now then, think “educated idiot”.

          • Mark Wright

            I think you are being obtuse. I have already alluded to poor parenting being a contributor. Did I need to spell that out in words of one syllable ? The issue under discussion was whether Common Core is a good or bad thing. I contend that providing a common grounding in literacy and numeracy is fundamental to any education system. If you can’t provide a level playing field then you are being discriminatory. The extension of abandoning Common Core is that educators could decide that the ability to do basic math was unnecessary and delete it from the curriculum. Or they could decide that it was only required to teach number recognition as most mathematical functions are undertaken by electronic devices. Is that what you are advocating ?

      • Don in Ohio

        Rx7pj,
        The fossil fuels will last for centuries. The air and water is MUCH cleaner today than 50 years ago so why do you think it’s going to get worse?
        Seriously, give me a REAL reason.

        Do you have ANY common sense?

        • Tomahawk

          Allow me to answer, DnO. No, it doesn’t.

        • Mark Wright

          The air and water are cleaner because of the massive inroads made on reducing pollution by a variety of factors. Clean burn technology, reduction in fuel additives and improvements in refining have been contributors as has a huge reduction in the use of ‘dirty’ fossil fuels. Ironically, the reduction in industries like steelmaking which historically relied on energy sources like coking coal has also helped. Sure, there are large coal reserves available, but coal has some significant downsides. It increases the CO, CO2 and particulate levels in the atmosphere. It also adds to the SO2 levels (coal is rarely pure carbon) which then causes acid rain. Back in the day when coal was a prime energy source for electricity generation, towns and cities were hit by smog.

          Why do folk think that pollution will get worse than it is today ? Put simply, seven out of the top ten cities that have the worst smog levels globally, attribute this to coal fired industries including energy production and the volume of motor vehicles.

          Yes, the base of fossil fuels could last for centuries, provided it is carefully managed and there is greater use of alternative energy resources, but a full scale opening up of coal production in the US will shorten that lifespan. Moreover, burning more fossil fuels will, by definition, increase the levels of pollution.

          • Tomahawk

            Your synopsis is missing one key point. Those countries have not implemented the pollution control systems that we had in place here over fifteen years ago. Namely China, but there are others. We’ve long conquered our smog issues with effective emission controls. Those same controls are basically non-existent in many other countries. America has done its part, and then some. And blue collar Americans have been, and still are, paying a high price for it. Pun intended.

          • Mark Wright

            You are right, the US put in place pollution control systems, which did go some way to improving air quality. The snag is that smog still abounds with a number of cities in California and Texas being hit by it. LA tops the list of cities with the worst air pollution see https://weather.com/health/news/the-worst-cities-for-air . I note that a contributory factor for the West Coast having high pollution levels is the drift of particulates across the Pacific, however, that doesn’t explain high levels in Houston, Dallas and some of the more central and easterly states.
            The US still has smog days because of the increasing number of vehicles on the road – estimated at two per person. Regenerating the coal mining industry means finding new outlets to use it as an energy source. A policy of ‘America First’ would suggest that the US should be the prime beneficiary of any subsidised coal production, so it is not unreasonable to expect an uptick in coal fired power stations and factories. This will in turn increase the level of pollution because there is not a way to use coal as an energy source without causing some pollution. Blue collar America might have some mining jobs saved and possibly a few created, but the price will be high.

          • Tomahawk

            It’s impossible for mammals to breathe without “causing some pollution”. Pollution is a manageable risk, as we have demonstrated we’re quite capable of accomplishing here in the U.S. It will never be eliminated. A simple fact of life.

          • Mark Wright

            Pollution in the US is a sick joke. The US is the second largest producer of CO2 in the world (only China produces more) In terms of CO2 produced per capita, the US ranks 7th globally, behind five Middle Eastern states and Australia. (EDGAR database 2014) . Are you proud of that ?
            There is a deal of difference between CO2 emissions as a result of normal biological activity and those generated as a result of technological activity. The top polluters per capita are all oil producing nations, but being an oil producer doesn’t necessarily mean that a country is a major producer of CO2. Russia produces 25% less CO2 than the US and Venezuela 74% less.
            n.b. I prefer to use CO2 production for comparison purposes as the WHO air pollution stats are based purely on a limited number of stations that are centred in cities. In some instances the inference for the country has been drawn from a single station in a city. Countries as divers as Russia, Argentina, Singapore, Malta and the Maldives have their air pollution stats based on a single station.

          • Tomahawk

            My position is that CO2 isn’t a pollutant, therefore it shouldn’t even be on your hit list. You’re obviously a tree hugging greenie, so think trees.

          • Mark Wright

            So purely as a matter of interest, what do you consider to be a pollutant ?

      • MARLENE HESSLER

        Should we assume that you do not ride in automobiles? Or heat your home. Or use electric lighting?

        Ride your bike. Walk the talk you are spewing.

      • Tomahawk

        What’s your plan for when they don’t do that?

        • Jim Wuerl

          We will NEVER run out of energy as long as the adults are in charge!

          • Tomahawk

            Exactly!

          • Mark Wright

            Not quite true, no one has devised a generator that does not require energy to be consumed, in order to produce electricity. Moreover, if you use 1 joule of energy for production, you don’t get one joule of usable energy out. This is because a proportion gets lost as heat, sound etc. If you are referring to fossil fuels, burning them to then heat water to create steam. that then drives a generator to produce electricity, is a very inefficient process.
            I note your rider ‘..as long as the adults are in charge !’ Sadly, the US has a manchild president, who is more concerned about trying to prove more people came to his inauguration than Obama’s, than getting on with the job. So in that respect, the adults are quite definitely not in charge.

          • Tomahawk

            The manchild just transferred power to President Trump. Get over it.

          • Mark Wright

            Ahhh.. so you think that Trump spending a large proportion of his first full day in office, throwing a hissy fit with the media because they said that Obama’s first inauguration drew bigger crowds – supported by the way by figures from the Washington Metro and aerial footage. YOu are saying that this really was the most important item he should have been tackling ?
            Trump needs to get over the fact that he holds the prize for being the most reviled president at the point that he took office. A smart person would have looked at the popularity numbers and sought to address the issue. Trump just dug himself a bigger hole.
            As far as getting over it goes, I’m sitting on the sidelines with a big bag of popcorn. If this is how the Trump Presidency is starting, the next few months will be highly entertaining. I await gaffes aplenty, a profusion of bluster, more u turns, more mis-speaks and tweetstorms on a weekly basis. Mixed in with this will be court cases, protests, civil disobedience, the odd riot, scandal and possibly more. Might need to put in a shipping order.

          • Tomahawk

            It wasn’t a hissy fit. MSM has been “left handed” from the beginning of this election process, and Trump has had enough of it. So have we who voted for him. Washington Metro bears you out. However many others in attendance support that the aerial view that was presented by the press was inaccurate, of whom Brit Hume was one. Also noteworthy is the fact that nothing was mentioned regarding several of the entry gates being closed completely, or cordoned off, in an effort to beef up security. So your point is moot. And the only hole Trump is digging is for any and all in the bureaucracy we call a federal government, who have taken advantage of the very people who put them there. A smart person would have recognized this ten plus years ago. Buy a ticket out of here. Because you’re not gonna like the next eight years.

          • Mark Wright

            It wasn’t a hissy fit ? Oh come on… Trump was throwing a force 10 wobbly complaining about ‘dishonest media’, not once, not twice but continuously. He’s still whinging. He needs to grow a pair and rise above it. His tirades over the weekend and since make him look stupid. Had he kept his mouth shut, the story would have been forgotten by now and any of his policy pronouncements might have been given better coverage.
            Part of me believes that Trump actually flipped his wig this time as a ruse to distract the MSM from the dubious policies he subsequently released. Like dumping medical cover for 20million people before a new care insurance deal was agreed. Or cancelling participation in the TPP, but having no plans for bilaterals to replace it. China is already rubbing its hands with glee over this. The US has just given them carte blanche to take over trade in the Pacific Rim.
            I share your distaste for politicians and government officials who sell out to lobbyists and accept payments for advice to commercial organisations. The most effective way of draining the swamp is to make it a condition of employment that anyone in government or who is an elected official divests themselves of all stocks, shares, directorships or other employment, and ownership of, or involvement in business ventures. They would receive a stipend to cover living costs etc. Moreover, they would be required to publish their annual tax details so that the public could see they were without taint. Unfortunately, some of the Trump picks seem to be struggling with this and Trump himself has studiously ignored calls for transparency on his taxes and putting his business empire out of reach for the duration.
            Finally, I don’t need a ticket. An astute person would have determined that I am not a US resident (I have stated this much in other posts on this topic). Possibly because I am not directly affected by the election, I have a rather different viewpoint. From where I stand, Trump has the capacity (as does any US president) to bring about a world recession, spark a major conflict in the Pacific and/or provide Russia with opportunities for expansion. His stated policies of America First and Hire America are not likely to affect me, unless they bring about a collapse of the US economy.
            What is certain is that I will turn my back on doing business with the US as I cannot guarantee that the deals I strike today will be permitted to stand in the future. Trump is already seeking to renege on free trade deals with countries and would like to remove long established alliances. Faced with that prospect, I have already been looking at other trading partners. I will also advise people to be wary of travel to the US, particularly if they might be singled out because of the colour of their skin, or assumptions about their religious beliefs. I am not the only person who thinks this way. Trump is already starting to damage the US. Sadly, his supporters can’t see that.

          • Tomahawk

            This country has been being damaged for the past 8 years, and we’re depending on the incoming administration to counter that. So far, it seems as though they are attempting to do so. So trade where you wish to trade. It matters not to me. The fact that you’re not an American citizen, yet profoundly state your positions on American issues, tells me one thing. I shouldn’t even be conversing with your liberal butt. You haven’t walked in our shoes. I’m done with you.

          • Mark Wright

            So you are saying that only people in the US should hold views on US issues. OK so lets extend that a bit. ISIS is seeking to establish an Islamic Caliphate in the Middle East. You are not a citizen of a Middle Eastern nation, you may or may not be Muslim. Using your argument you have no right to comment on the value or otherwise of ISIS.
            OK so that is being deliberately provocative. Now let’s look at somewhere less controversial. Take Germany. The incoming administration has no idea of the issues facing Germany, yet has slammed Chancellor Merkel’s stance on migrants. They haven’t walked a mile in Merkel’s shoes so using your argument they have no right to criticise.
            The US has been damaged for the past 8 years ? Really ?? Have you not noticed that all major economies have gone through the same doldrums. By comparison, the US has done remarkably well. Unemployment is low (around 5% IIRC). 5.9 million unfilled jobs. Low inflation, but also minimal increases in wages. Unfortunately the two go hand in hand. Low interest rates. Recovery from the sub prime mortgage crises which were caused by the preceding Republican administration. No boom and bust. Are you saying that damaged the country ? I can cite several countries that would love to have the level of stability that the US has enjoyed for the past 8 years.
            What exactly are you hoping the new administration will provide that the outgoing one didn’t ?

      • walter white

        Better yet. What is your plan when we don’t run out, and you look extremely stupid for not realizing that we are sitting on enough fossil fuel to supply the world for many, many years?

    • Mark Wright

      Yes, if the US invests in more hydro and wind power. Hydro should be easy, Trump has proven that there has not been a drought in California hasn’t he ?
      Wind power may be a bit more controversial. rump has objected to wind farms in Scotland because they spoil the view for his golf course. Never mind. I suggest that the administration surround the White House and Congress with wind turbines. The volume of hot air emanating from those two buildings from Republican speeches will have them spinning merrily.

      • Tomahawk

        Your attitude is precisely why we elected DJT. We’ve had enough of it.

      • The Redman

        Hahahaahahahahahahaha

  • The Redman

    Smart white-folks ruined america

  • The Redman

    white-folks use more water den all the other race of people on the earth, and still stank most of the time wit their loud smelling shampoos and soaps.